Pelajar Cemerlang Series 2

This is the second series of videos where some of the students who scored distinctions in the June ML O level exams volunteered to share their success recipe. The videos serve as good motivation resources for future graduating students working towards ML distinctions. You can view all the videos here; https://karangkutu.com/pelajar-cemerlang-series/

What a Box of Surprise!

Wow! We didn’t expect the prototype for our Professional Learning Team (PLT) project next year to look this good. What is our PLT project all about? We will make the announcement when the time is right. You’ll be excited to know what we are working on. For now, let’s keep it under wrap. We will proceed to order 40 sets of this prototype from the Game Crafter for our graduating students next year.

TUTLA FOR SECONDARY SCHOOLS IN THE N3 CLUSTER SCHOOLS

Great news!
The 70 sets of Tutla that we ordered using our N3 cluster funding have arrived yesterday. We will start distributing them to the N3 secondary schools offering Malay language from next Tuesday. Each school will receive 10 sets of Tutla. We hope students from these secondary schools will have fun and enjoy learning the rules of the Malay language from playing Tutla.

Moving on, we will produce a series of videos in the coming months to share ideas on how to play Tutla. We will place these video here: https://karangkutu.com/tutla/ 

Do check them out.

How to order Tutla
We have received queries from teachers from other secondary schools who would like to purchase Tutla. You can order Tutla directly from the Game Crafter here: https://www.thegamecrafter.com/games/tutla. The Game Crafter will provide you with invoice for your order.

While we are the designers of Tutla, we engaged the Game Crafter to produce Tutla for us. We do not keep excess stock of Tutla and order new sets from the Game Crafter whenever the need arises.

The Game Crafter is located in the US and we choose the Game Crafter to produce Tutla because it allows us to order Tutla sets in small numbers.

Funding from MLLPC
We plan to apply funding to produce 500 sets of Tutla from the Malay Language Learning and Promotion Committee (MLLPC). If the funding is approved we look forward to organize a series of workshops in the coming years to share ideas with teachers how to use Tutla in their classrooms. At the end of the workshops, we will distribute the Tutla sets to the participants for free.

Do pray that we get the funding!

For further queries on Tutla, do drop us an email.

Cheers ; )

TUTLA | The Card Game that Makes the Learning of Language Rules Fun!

We successfully conducted our sharing on Tutla at Pei Hwa Secondary School this afternoon. Our teachers-audience can reach us at karangkutu@gmail.com for any query as we did not manage to carry out the Q&A session because of time constraint.

As mentioned during the sharing, all N3 cluster secondary schools that offer Malay will receive10 sets of Tutla each by the end of October. We will be contacting the ML teachers from these schools once we have received the Tutla shipment from TheGameCrafter.com.

For teachers from other secondary schools who would like to order a copy of Tutla, you can do so here: https://www.thegamecrafter.com/games/tutla

We hope your students will have a ball of a time playing Tutla in class as they learn Malay language rules in fun and engaging ways!

Having Trouble Teaching Students Language Rules? Try TUTLA

We developed Tutla as a teaching and learning aid primarily to facilitate the learning of our scientific rules of learning imbuhan. It is a bridge from knowing the rules to applying them when completing imbuhan exercises.

However,we soon realize Tutla is a powerful tool to engage students to learn language rules. What limits its affordances is the creativity of teachers. We will post here from time to time how to play Tutla as we explore its uses in a language class.

We look forward to share how we use Tutle in our cluster sharing in September at Pei Hwa Secondary School.

Note-taking Versus Note-making

We get our students to write their own notes.

We do this because primarily we want our students to make sense of what they learn in our lessons. In the past we provided our students with notes that we wrote on the whiteboard, present them on powerpoint slides or print them on handouts. However, we soon learn that this approach only makes learning passive and transfer of knowledge difficult.

Secondly, we insist our students to write their own notes so that they have ownership. Their notes are unique as what they take away as key points from our lessons differ because of their prior understanding and knowledge vary.

However, Rick Smith has taught us that self note-taking even if ended up with good notes is not necessarily enough for effective learning. We learn that self note-taking can be a passive learning endeavour too. Rick offered us the idea of note-making and showed us that note-making is more active and focused activity where students assimilate all information they have written and take understanding to a (meta) higher level. He shared with us a number of note-making activities and we use them after we have taught a body of knowledge to help our students consolidate what they have learn from their notes.

Below are several note-making activities that we have used in our lessons apart from the one shown in the video above:

Summary

We carried out this note-making activity as a whole-class approach. We started the summary by writing the first two sentences on the whiteboard. Students were invited to contribute two sentence to the summary but writing their second sentence only after their peers had added their first sentences. Students had to ensure that their sentences provided a good flow to the structure of the summary for easy understanding. At the end of this activity, students were invited to review the summary to critique and query each other contributions.

Slogan

Student has to derive the essence of a body of knowledge taught and turn it into one short phrase or a slogan. A good slogan is memorable and durable. When a good slogan occupies prime real estate in a student’s subconscious, it aids the student to recall the body of knowledge he or she had learnt.

Questions!

We used this note-making activity as an exit pass for students to leave the class at the end of our lesson. We started by asking students to select only three facts out of the many things that they had learnt from our lesson and come up with a corresponding question for each fact. Students were then invited to stand up and approach other students (one at a time) to trade a question that they had come up with earlier. At the end of the activity, we asked if there was any question that the students were not able to answer correctly at their first attempt. This allows us to surface student’s misconceptions and address them immediately.

Translation

This note-making activity is useful as a starter activity when we have a body of knowledge to teach. We used this activity when we had to teach students a list of peribahasa or proverbs. We divided the class into groups and assigned each group to translate the meanings of selected set of peribahasa into English. To our amazement, the students were deeply engaged that we saw them taking turn to teach the peribahasa and correcting each other translation. This activity allows students to develop their baseline understanding of the peribahasa before we start teaching them to students

Acronym

We employ this note-making activity when we require students to bring into memory procedural knowledge. Students has to first derive key ideas of a body of knowledge taught before they could encapsulate them into an acronym. As with slogan, a good acronym is memorable and durable, and it is a effective tool to help students recall key ideas of what they had learnt.

We encourage you to try these note-making activities with your students. Good luck!

The Scientific Approach to Learning Imbuhan

To answer an imbuhan question students have to cross two bridges. The first bridge is to identify which part of speech (for example, verb, noun or adjective), the answer to the imbuhan question belongs. The second bridge is to select the right imbuhan from a list that belongs to that part of speech.

Our scientific approach to learning imbuhan helps students to cross the first bridge. Having successfully cross the first bridge, student will then choose imbuhan from the correct list as they have chosen the right part of speech as the answer to the imbuhan question.

Make sense? : ) Check out the video to find out why.